Tuesday, March 21, 2017

My Boys

It's fun to use real people as inspiration for the characters in my novels. My upcoming Christmas novel with Love Inspired Historical has a set of fraternal twins. I used my own twins as templates, from their eye and hair color, to their personalities. I tried to imagine how they might react if they were placed in the same situations as the twins in my story. By using real people as inspiration for fictional characters, I hope to bring the story to life in a way that resonates with my readers.

The character of Zebulun Trask is inspired by my older twin. He's sweet, silly, and compassionate. 




The character of Levi Trask is inspired by my second twin. He's curious, smart, and likes to be in control at all times.




The story is titled: The Gift of Twins. It releases with LIH in December, 2017.

Friday, January 20, 2017

A Moonbow Night, by Laura Frantz


There are some books that read like a fast food meal, quick and easy, with little thought. Some read like a decadent dessert, rich, filling, and sweet. Others are like a snack to be read in little bits, as time allows or when you're bored. Some are like a family meal, creating good memories, lots of laughter, and heartfelt moments. Still, there are others, like A Moonbow Night, that read like a six course meal which should be savored, unhurried, purposeful, and satisfying to the very end.

I just closed the pages of A Moonbow Night and my heart is full of Kentucke, Boones, Indians, settlers, friends gained, friends lost, breathless kisses, enduring love, betwixt and betimes, and a beguiling moonbow. What a stunning tale Laura Frantz has spun. With each scene, each character, each backstory crumb, the gossamer threads are woven together to make a tapestry so intricate and so beautiful, it's truly a work of art.

Laura's passion for Kentucky is breathed into the very essence of her characters and storyworld. My own desire to see Kentucky has increased tenfold, though I feel as if I've been there and it has become a part of me. She has taken my preconceived ideas of Kentucky and turned them inside out, teaching me about the history that shaped the state and country and the men and women who sacrificed everything to settle the land.

The story is full of historical references, well-researched details, and breathtaking prose. Several times I stopped just to enjoy a sentence or capture a feeling. The romance grows gently as it changes the hero and heroine, drawing them out of their brokenness and into a place of healing. Some scenes are so powerful, they will leave your heart beating a little harder and make you eager for the next.

I loved reading this story and experiencing a piece of history I knew little about. When I came to the end, I was sad to say goodbye, but thankful I had been invited on the journey.

Thank you to Laura for another adventure, another unforgettable hero, and another timeless love story tucked inside my heart.

About the Story:
After fleeing Virginia, Temperance Tucker and her family established an inn along the Shawnee River. It's a welcome way station for settlers and frontiersmen traveling through the wild Cumberland region of Kentucke--men like Sion Morgan, a Virginia surveyor who arrives at the inn with his crew looking for an experienced guide. When his guide appears, Sion balks. He certainly didn't expect a woman. But it is not long before he must admit that Tempe's skill in the wilderness rivals his own. Still, the tenuous tie they are forming is put to the test as they encounter danger after danger and must rely on each other.

With her signature sweeping style and ability to bring the distant past to vivid life, Laura Frantz beckons readers to join her in a land of Indian ambushes, conflicting loyalties, and a tentative love that meanders like a cool mountain stream.

About the Author:
Award-winning author Laura Frantz is passionate about all things historical, particularly the 18th-century, and writes her manuscripts in longhand first. Her stories often incorporate Scottish themes that reflect her family heritage. She is a direct descendant of George Hume, Wedderburn Castle, Berwickshire, Scotland, who was exiled to the American colonies for his role in the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715, settled in Virginia, and is credited with teaching George Washington surveying in the years 1748-1750. Frantz lives and writes in a log cabin in the heart of Kentucky.